Erwin & McCarthy Team - KELLER WILLIAMS REALTY / Metropolitan



Posted by Erwin & McCarthy Team on 4/18/2018

One feature new homeowners most look forward to adding is a backyard garden. Afterall, is there anything better than a homegrown tomato or zucchini?

Another benefit of homeownership is the ability to start a compost heap for your garden. By skipping chemical fertilizers in favor of compost you will not only have a great way to recycle yard and kitchen scraps but also naturally replenish the soil. This leads to healthier plants, a healthier you and little by little a healthier planet.

Compost is so nourishing because of what is called humus. Humus is the part of soils made from decomposition. It restores nutrients to the malnourished soil, helps the soil retain moisture and even keep diseases from affecting your plants.

To get started youíll want to choose how youíll go about creating your compost. You can either opt for a tumbling composter, which takes a lot of the manual work out of turning your pile, or creating your compost on top of the ground, where it will have easy access to earthworms and easily drain excess water.

When creating a compost pile you will want it to be at least 3 feet long by 3 feet wide. You will also want your pile to be about 3 feet high. To help keep your pile neat and contained you can build, or buy, a fence-like box for your compost pile.  

When you have your compost ďstorageĒ of choice ready to go youíll also want to have a good amount of scraps to begin building your pile up to those 3 feet I mentioned or fill up your bin. The best way to do this is to keep two sealable containers in your kitchen to toss scraps in for your pile. However, you donít want to toss just anything into this container.


What you can put into your Dry (also called Brown) scrap container:

  • Eggshells

  • Tea leaves and/or coffee grounds

  • Dead flowers

  • Cardboard and paper goods (they must be unwaxed)

  • 100% cotton and/or wool (no synthetics)


What you can put in your Moist (also called Green) scrap container:

  • Vegetable scraps

  • Fruit scraps

  • Grass and leaves

  • Manure from herbivorous animals (cows, horses, rabbits, etc)


What you should never put in your containers:

  • Meat, fish or bone scraps

  • Manure from carnivorous animals (cats, dogs, etc)

  • Waxed, sticky or treated paper products and/or wood

  • Citrus peels or onions


Begin your pile with a layer of sticks and straw if you will be building it on bare ground. This will allow your compost to properly drain and avoid becoming oversaturated. Next, alternate layers of moist/green and dry/brown materials to an even 50/50 ratio.  

You will want turn over your pile every few weeks to allow for oxygenation. If your pile begins steaming that means the decomposition process is in action!  When it begins to turn a crumbly black in the center and earthworms are showing up compost has begun to/is fully formed and ready to use in your garden!




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Erwin & McCarthy Team on 4/17/2018

This Single-Family in Manchester, NH recently sold for $155,600. This style home was sold by Erwin & McCarthy Team - KELLER WILLIAMS REALTY / Metropolitan.


75 Tarbell Street, Manchester, NH 03104

Single-Family

$124,000
Price
$155,600
Sale Price

3
Bedrooms
6
Rooms
1
Baths
Bungalow located great location convenient for commuting. Near shopping and Derryfield Country Club. Large city lot with spacious backyard. 1st Floor Bedroom and Full bath. 3 bedrooms. Eat-in kitchen. Property is NOT located in a FEMA Special Flood Hazard Area but is listed as a moderate to low flood risk. State law requires Smoke/ Carbon Monoxide detectors be installed for properties having combustible fuel heaters/furnaces, fireplaces, hot water heaters, clothes dryers, cooking appliances, or an attached garage, but seller (HUD) is exempt from this requirement as a Federal Entity, Has a heating oil storage tank located in the basement. Any required system repairs will be the buyer's expense, Repairs exceed $10,000. Repairs may include but not limited to structure, electrical, roof, HVAC, and plumbing; Inspection recommended, Needed repairs: floor covering; interior doors; toilet and basement windows, Repair-secure electrical system and wires, Defective paint surfaces. Misc.: Uninsured - Eligible for 203K Financing. HUD Home. Sold AS IS by electronic bid only. Property available 03-19-18. Bids due by 03-23-18 at 11:59 PM Central Time then daily until sold. FHA Case #341-142503. Financing is cash, conventional and FHA. Per FHA appraisal property is 1472 SF. LBP Addendum.






Categories: Sold Homes  


Posted by Erwin & McCarthy Team on 4/11/2018

Spring is just around the corner, and that means itís almost time to get started with the cleaning and organizing youíve been avoiding all winter. If youíre like me, it takes more than just some unsightly windows and cluttered drawers to motivate myself to tackle a big cleaning project. Thatís why Iíve created this weeklong spring cleaning challenge.

In this challenge, weíll cover different cleaning projects each day. Donít worry--each dayís work wonít take more than an hour or two to complete, so even the busiest among us should be able to find time to fit the whole challenge in. By the end of the week, it will all be worth it when you look around your house and see the sparkling surfaces just in time for spring.

Day 1: Kitchen

On the first day of our spring cleaning challenge, weíll start with one of the most grueling places to get it out of the way early. If youíve been cooking indoors all winter, odds are grease and cooking oils have made their way into your oven, microwave, toaster, and cooking surfaces. Today is all about the degreaser and elbow grease.

For a homemade degreaser, mix a few drops of lemon or citrus with white vinegar and water and put them together in a spray bottle. For spots that are caked on, spray first, let them soak and sprinkle with baking soda while you clean the rest of the kitchen. This will loosen the grease so you can go back and scrub it off later.

Day 2: Bathroom

While weíre tackling the tough rooms, letís head to the bathroom on day two. A thorough bathroom cleaning doesnít just include the sink, toilet, and tub, but also their drains. Itís also a good time to change curtain liners or clean your shower door. Spraying Rain-X on the door after cleaning it will keep it from getting foggy for a couple months.

Today is also a good day to go through your medicine cabinet and get rid of anything thatís expired. Then, make a list of supplies you need to restock.

Day 3: Bedrooms

Today letís take a break from scrubbing. Head into the bedrooms and change the sheets. Clean mirrors, vacuum, and then dust all of the surfaces (in that order--you donít want to kick up debris from the carpets once youíve already dusted).

The last task for today is to declutter. Itís a good time to go through drawers and pick out clothes you no longer wear to donate. A good rule of thumb is to ask yourself if you wore it in the last year or two. If not, odds are it wonít be missed very much.

Day 4: Living Room

The living room is the area of the house people like to keep most presentable, and therefore usually doesnít appear dirty at a first glance. However, since itís also the room that gets a lot of foot traffic, youíll likely find that the carpets, sofa cushions, and curtains could use a good cleaning.

Day 5: Windows

This one is pretty self-explanatory. But itís useful to do them all in one day so you donít have to keep pulling out the paper towels and Windex.

Day 6: Refrigerator and Pantry

Get rid of expired condiments, and toss out or donate canned foods that have been sitting in your cabinets for over a year. If you need to de-ice your freezer or change water filters in your freezer now is the time.

Day 7: Car

For the last day, letís head outside and clean your vehicle. If this day doesnít apply to you, it could be a good time to clean out the garage or wash outdoor furniture.


To help you out, print out this checklist and stick it on your refrigerator until you've completed the challenge. 


 





Posted by Erwin & McCarthy Team on 4/4/2018


56 Sherri Ann Avenue, Nashua, NH 03064

Single-Family

$375,000
Price

3
Bedrooms
9
Rooms
2/1
Full/Half Baths
This open-concept colonial home in the North End of Nashua is situated on a cul de sac. Hardwoods throughout the first floor living areas and plenty of natural light make this home feel bright and welcoming. The kitchen has granite counters, glass tile back splash, and a generous pantry. The master has double closet and an en suite bath. Two more bedrooms and a full bath complete the second floor. The nicely finished basement has a second family room with an attached area perfect for a home office and a second room for the kids. Enjoy the outdoors in the hot tub, and included is the storage shed. Showings will start with the Open House on April 7, 2018.
Open House
Saturday
April 07 at 12:00 PM to 2:00 PM
Cannot make the Open Houses?
Location: 56 Sherri Ann Avenue, Nashua, NH 03064    Get Directions






Categories: Open House  


Posted by Erwin & McCarthy Team on 4/4/2018


56 Sherri Ann Avenue, Nashua, NH 03064

Single-Family

$375,000
Price

3
Bedrooms
9
Rooms
2/1
Full/Half Baths
This open-concept colonial home in the North End of Nashua is situated on a cul de sac. Hardwoods throughout the first floor living areas and plenty of natural light make this home feel bright and welcoming. The kitchen has granite counters, glass tile back splash, and a generous pantry. The master has double closet and an en suite bath. Two more bedrooms and a full bath complete the second floor. The nicely finished basement has a second family room with an attached area perfect for a home office and a second room for the kids. Enjoy the outdoors in the hot tub, and included is the storage shed. Showings will start with the Open House on April 7, 2018.
Open House
Saturday
April 07 at 12:00 PM to 2:00 PM
Cannot make the Open Houses?
Location: 56 Sherri Ann Avenue, Nashua, NH 03064    Get Directions






Categories: New Homes  




Tags